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Nautical Fiction Index

Authors Wint - Woodl

Winton, John [pseud. John Pratt] (1931-2001)

Artful Bodger series:

  1. We Joined the Navy. Michael Joseph, 1959. 253 pages

    The Bodger (Lt. Cmdr. Robert Badger) tries to train a class of raw recruits on their first cruise at the RN Academy.

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  3. We Saw the Sea. Michael Joseph, 1960. 205 pages

    Some of the Bodger's former charges join him in the madhouse cruiser CAROUSEL, where he is first Lieutenant, for a cruise in Far Eastern waters.

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  5. Down the Hatch. Michael Joseph, 1961. 204 pages

    The Artful Bodger takes command of the RN's newest and largest submarine.

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  7. Never Go to Sea. Michael Joseph, 1963. 213 pages

    The Artful Bodger now finds himself Assistant Director of Naval Public Relations at the Ministry of Political Warfare. "Saddled" with a racehorse it becomes imperative for his future career to enter, and succeed, in the sport of kings!

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  9. All the Nice Girls. Michael Joseph, 1964. 222 pages

    The submarine HMS SEAHORSE (featured in Never Go to Sea) goes into the dockyard for a major refit. Lieutenant Dagwood Jones has a chance to pursue various young ladies and give his commanding officer, the Bodger, many anxious moments. A humorous insight into the Royal Navy's, not always cordial, relationship with the civilians who repair and refit their ships.

 

 

 

HMS Leviathan. Michael Joseph, 1967. 421 pages

Jet-age aircraft carrier.


 

 

 

The fighting Téméraire. Michael Joseph, 1971. 239 pages

British Polaris sub spying in the Black Sea.


 

 

 

One of Our Warships. Michael Joseph, 1975. 207 pages

Deals with a possible atrocity at sea when an RN frigate fires on a sampan during operations in Southeast Asia. Told in reminscience form. Revealing look at the relationships between officers of a navy.


 

 

 

Good Enough for Nelson. Michael Joseph, 1977. 239 pages


 

 

 

 

Aircraft Carrier. Michael Joseph, 1980. 303 pages

"A novel of the War in the Pacific".


 

 

 

Hands To Action Stations!: Naval poetry and verse from World War II - Chosen by John Winton. Bluejacket Books, 1980. 143 pages

Editor. An assortment of famous and anonymous verse, mainly from serving naval personnel - a continuing tradition as aficionados of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey and Maturin series will appreciate.


 

 

The Good Ship Venus, or, The Lass who Loved a Sailor. Michael Joseph, 1984. 219 pages

Humourous account of first RN warship to have women on board. The author himself found it rather amusing when women actually did begin to go to sea not too long after it was published.


 

 

 

A Drowning War. Michael Joseph, 1985. 285 pages

WW II Battle of the Atlantic as seen through the eyes of three participants who meet in a climatic ending to the novel: a Fleet Air Arm Swordfish pilot, a Kriegsmarine submarine officer, and a USN destroyer officer. Excellent, tightly-written story. The author uses post-war revelations for marvelous irony.


 

 

Polaris : fears and dreams. Michael Joseph, 1989. 248 pages

 

 

 

 


Night of the Scorpion. Severn House, 1994. 266 pages

A wartime romance describing a dangerous operation carried out by a Flotilla based in Corsica during World War II, who work for the Resistance and pick-up escaped prisoners-of-war, crashed Allied aircrew and people trying to evade the Gestapo.

 

 

 

Winton, Tim (1960- )

Shallows. Atheneum, 1984. 235 pages

When Queenie Cookson decides to join an antiwhaling protest group, she defies her husband, her ancestry, and her community.

 

 

 

 

Wodehouse, P. G. (1881-1975)

The Luck of the Bodkins. Herbert Jenkins, 1935. 286 pages

Monty Bodkin's wooing of Gertrude Butterwick on the RMS Atlantic is not progressing as it should. And the cause of all the trouble is Miss Lotus Blossum, the brightest star in Hollywood's firmament.

 

 

 

 

Wolfe, Gene (1931-2019)

Pirate Freedom. TOR, 2007. 320 pages

Father Christopher was once a pirate captain, hundreds of years before his birth. Fresh from the monastery, the former novice finds himself inexplicably transported back to the Golden Age of Piracy, where an unexpected new life awaits him. At first, he resists joining the notorious Brethren of the Coast, but he soon embraces the life of a buccaneer, even as he succumbs to the seductive charms of a beautiful and enigmatic senorita. As the captain of his own swift ship, which may or may not be cursed, he plunders the West Indies in search of Spanish gold.


 

Home Fires. TOR, 2011. 304 pages

Chelle and Skip have been separated by Chelle's tour of duty in a war against aliens from distant solar systems. They find their relationship complicated by time differentials that cause an injured and war-weary Chelle to age only a few months while Skip reaches his forties. Bulk of the novel takes place on a cruise liner.

 

 

 

 

Wolpert, Stanley (1927-2019)

Aboard the Flying Swan. Scribner, 1954. 357 pages

Set in the Merchant Maine, dealing with shipboard life in the engine department.

 

 

 

 

 

Wood, James (1918-1984)

The Rain Islands. Duckworth, 1957. 198 pages

A Novel Set in the Faeroe Islands.


 

 

 

The Sealer. Hutchinson, 1959. 224 pages

World War 2 novel about the pursuit of a German sea-raider, the fictitious steamship SEEADLER. Wood’s narrator is Scotsman James Fraser, a trawler fisherman turned merchant seaman, who, after surviving the sinking of his freighter out of a North Atlantic convoy, is recruited by the Royal Navy for a bit of espionage. In due course he finds himself in the wilds of South America’s Tierra del Fuego and the Straits of Magellan, the German raider’s probable home base.


 

The Lisa Bastian. Hutchinson, 1960. 191 pages

Adventures of James Fraser (from The Sealer), maverick trawler skipper, continue from Bergen where Fraser and his crew (including the token black, the cod intellectual, the rough Polish mate) agree to take a couple of girls and an (unrelated) Hungarian political refugee from Norway to Shetland with a little fishing on the wrong side of the territorial limit en route. The Russians want the Hungarian, the mate wants one girl, the other girl wants the Captain. The real baddies get shot, their sidekicks merely winged.


 

Be Thou My Judge. Hutchinson, 1966. 192 pages

U.S. title: Voyage into Nowhere. A Navy Lieutenant is falsely jailed for heroin possession, then is sprung by a gang who wants his services. A basic sea thriller.


 

 

 

The Friday Run. Hutchinson, 1967. 190 pages

Skipper James Fraser decides to go to sea on a Friday run during which an unmarked and frightening canister surfaces with a load of fish shortly after a large plane has crashed.


 

 

 

Three Blind Mice. Hutchinson, 1969. 208 pages

Mystery/thriller, North Sea fishing vessel, Cold War intrigue.

 

 

 

 

 

Woodland, Geoff

Ice King. MDW, 2010. 481 pages

In 1804, Liverpool was the largest slave trading port in Great Britain, yet her influential traders felt threatened by the success, in Parliament, of the anti-slavery movement. Few, in Liverpool, condemned the 'Trade'. William King, son of a Liverpool trader, is sickened by what he experiences aboard a Spanish slaver, and dares to speak out against the Trade.

 

 

 


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